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Speak out and be heard!

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The invention of the Internet and rapid technological advances has brought our entire world into a global village which has had significant impacts on business to business relations throughout various parts of the world. Numerous call centers and the virtual assistants have been established to connect merchants from diverse parts of the world allowing them to interact daily.

Speak Out and be heard!

The main obstacle has proven to be communication. Most of these jobs require a level of proficiency in English to prove successful. United States employers have a high demand for workers who they can easily communicate with so their businesses can remain running smoothly without any loss of time or money due to miscommunication. There is little doubt that those language students who work on their American Accent training will to have more job opportunities and higher salaries.

On the contrary: Nine times out of ten (by my less than scientific count), the speaking habits that prevent non-native speakers of English from being understood are the same ones that can make native speakers of English hard to understand.
These include: speaking too fast, slurring or mumbling words, saying things that are disconnected, or poorly organized, not knowing what point you’re trying to make, not leaving time for the listener to absorb one idea before rushing on to the next (see “speaking too fast”), etc. ,and finally notice that there’s nothing here about accents. In fact, if accents were an insurmountable issue, people from Boston, MA (my home town) wouldn’t be able to converse with their colleagues from Mobile, AL.

It is possible that people from North Jersey would not be able to communicate with people from South Jersey! Everyone has accents — the exceptions being airline pilots, telemarketers, and National Public Radio announcers — and yet somehow manage to communicate around them.
At the same time, however, there may be legitimate reasons for job requirements based on linguistic characteristics, such as requiring that employees be fluent in English or speak in a way that can be easily understood by customers and coworkers. Although linguistic rules will be scrutinized carefully by courts to make sure they aren’t discriminatory, those rules are legal if they are necessary for business reasons.

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